coming-third-jewish-temple-israel-antichrist-daniel-9-27-kjvThis Temple Will Not Be The LORD’s Temple, The Glory Of God Will Not Inhabit It.

“And he shall confirm the covenant with many for one week: and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease, and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.” Daniel 9:27 (KJV)

Yesterday, End Times Headlines posted an article about the momentous announcement of a the Temple Institute located in Jerusalem, Israel, regarding the Red Heifer. As most of you know, the Temple Institute has been working tirelessly for the past 30-plus years to recreate all the items needed for the rebuilt Jewish Temple. They work they have accomplished in that time is nothing less than astounding.

The Bible in Daniel 9 (see above scripture) also talks about a Jewish Temple that will be standing during the time of Jacob’s Trouble, as found in Jeremiah 30:7 (KJV). Since there have already been 2 Jewish Temples with none left standing since 70 AD, we understand that Daniel is talking about the Third Jewish Temple. This is the same Temple that the Temple Institute has been laboring so hard to construct. The Prophet Daniel says, however, that instead of the Shekinah Glory of the God of Abraham, the Antichrist himself will sit in the Holy of Holies, thus defiling it.

What the Prophet Daniel Saw will happen in our lifetime

“Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.

Know therefore and understand, that from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince shall be seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times.

And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; and the end thereof [shall be] with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined.

And he shall confirm the covenant with many for one week: and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease, and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.” Daniel 9: 24-27 (KJV)

Israeli Housing Minister calls for the building of the Third Jewish Temple

“Alas! for that day is great, so that none is like it: it is even the time of Jacob’s trouble; but he shall be saved out of it.” Jeremiah 30:7 (KJV)

In the 9th chapter of the book of Daniel, we read a prophecy about the coming end times. The New Testament calls it the Great Tribulation, the Old Testament calls it the ‘time of Jacob’s trouble’, but they both are speaking of the same event. This event is a 7-year period, preceded by the Rapture, which kicks off the start of the 7 years of tribulation.

Daniel’s 70 Week was put on hold when Jesus the Messiah was put the death on the cross. That same 70th Week will be restarted immediately after the Rapture of the Church, and event that kicks of the Time of Jacob’s Trouble, the Great Tribulation from Matthew 24. Daniel was given a vision far into the future, pointing to a time when the Jewish Temple would be rebuilt. The Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed by the Romans in 70 AD, and for nearly 2,000 years now it has laid in ruins, with just parts of the Temple walls and some of the foundations remaining. Watchers of end times bible prophecy have long speculated as to whether or not the Temple would be built for a third time. But Daniel 9, verse 27, clearly sees that there is a rebuilt Temple in the end times. Our time.

This Third Temple will be taken over by the Lawless One, commonly known as the Antichrist, at exactly three and one half years after the start of the Time of Jacob’s Trouble. This Temple will not be the LORD’s temple, the Glory of God will not inhabit it.

So pray for the Jewish people who will be deceived into thinking that this Third Temple will be the Lord’s Temple, because it will in no wise be. It will be the Temple of Satan himself, as Daniel so aptly pointed out thousands of years ago.

In the New Testament, Jesus talking about the rebuilt Jewish Temple warns the Jews to “flee into the mountains” when this event of the Antichrist sitting in the Temple takes place. And who does Jesus Himself quote when He issues this warning? Why, none other than the Prophet Daniel!

“When ye therefore shall see the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, stand in the holy place, (whoso readeth, let him understand:) Then let them which be in Judaea flee into the mountains: Let him which is on the housetop not come down to take any thing out of his house: Neither let him which is in the field return back to take his clothes. And woe unto them that are with child, and to them that give suck in those days! But pray ye that your flight be not in the winter, neither on the sabbath day: For then shall be great tribulation, such as was not since the beginning of the world to this time, no, nor ever shall be.” Matthew 24:15-21 (KJV)

In that you have complete harmony between the Old and New Testaments about prophecy that will come to pass within our lifetimes. How scary and exciting is it to be alive in the last generation before the Rapture.

Are you ready for what comes next?


From Living Waters, creators of the award-winning TV program “The Way of the Master” and the hit movies “180” and “Evolution vs. God,” comes the powerful film “Audacity.” Executive produced by TV co-host and best-selling author Ray Comfort (Hell’s Best Kept Secret, Scientific Facts in the Bible), this film delivers an unexpected, eye-opening look at the controversial topic of homosexuality.

Peter (Travis Owens) is an aspiring comedian encouraged by his friend Ben (Ben Price, Australia’s Got Talent finalist) to perform at the local comedy club. But stage fright isn’t Peter’s only fear. When confronted with one of today’s most divisive issues, he feels compelled to speak, but can he? Challenged by his coworker Diana (Molly Ritter) to defend his convictions about homosexuality and gay marriage, will he have the courage to stand for what he believes—even at the risk of losing a friendship? And how will he respond when faced with a harrowing life-or-death experience?

“Audacity” uses a unique approach to address a very sensitive subject in contemporary society. Regardless of your views on homosexuality, you’ll gain fresh insights and a new perspective.

For more information:

sodom & gomorra

Remember when fairy tales ended with a monogamous couple consummating their marriage with a wedding kiss as we watched for the bride to lift up her foot up signaling they would live happily ever after?

Well, the Supreme Court has just murdered that tradition. Its dark prince majority threw daggers through the heart of millennium honored institution, mocking its sacred origins in order to join together men with men and women with women.

Leading up to this decision, lower courts levied draconian fines at business owners who dared to cling to their so-called “outdated” traditional values. One such judge recommended a $135,000 fine against family business bakers Aaron and Melissa Klein of Sweet Cakes By Melissa in Gresham, Oregon for refusing to inscribe a pro-same-sex marriage slogan on the top of a wedding cake.

So, let me ask you a question: Regardless of whether you consider yourself to be a conservative, moderate, libertarian or liberal, do you really think it’s right or fair for a small family business to get nailed with an eighth of a million dollar fine– just for exercising their first amendment rights?

Remember when activists put on their nice face, portraying same-sex marriage as being so sugary sweet? Who on earth would want to be such an intolerant ‘hater’ as to deny true love to be extended to same-sex couples? But today we are seeing who are the true intolerant haters: Those who refuse to allow others to hold to their traditional values and even going so far as to ruin their lives for simply exercising their first amendment rights.

Baker Melissa Klein gave her 17 word unassailable defense as, “Being a baker, the cake is our canvas and we get to put our artwork on it.” But the judge didn’t see it that way. But rather than capitulate to the tyranny of the truly intolerant, Aaron and Melissa Klein closed shop as a matter of conscious. Regardless how morals factor into this topic, let’s look at this from a practical matter, what kind of impact will this sort of newfangled cultural renaissance have on our economy?

Ask yourself, will this boost the economy, shutting down traditionalists? And will it boost or lose jobs? Lest we forget, it was small businesses like bakeries that helped build the United States into the largest economy in world history. But God is not mocked. If aberrant lifestyles are continually foisted upon our national backbone that once made America stand tall, we will soon become decrepit, hunched over and die a much deserved death as a nation.

So here’s the challenge, for ‘We the People’ to stand up against homosexual tyranny. It’s not free speech. It’s not love. It’s not tolerance. It’s homosexual tyranny. And no matter what the Supreme Court calls it, it’s not marriage. Congress now must muster the courage to impeach those Supreme Court justices, just Associate Justice Samuel Chase was impeached in 1805.

Please forward a link to this video to anyone you know who still has a backbone. Thank you.

A Message For Our Times

Posted: June 13, 2015 in Uncategorized


Delivered by Jonathan Cahn, author of the best-selling book “The Harbinger,” Jan. 21, 2013, the morning of Barack Obama’s second presidential inauguration, at the Presidential Inaugural Prayer Breakfast.

The speech became pointed when Cahn addressed his words to Obama: “Can you lay your left hand upon His Word and then with your right hand enact laws against it? Can you invoke the name of God to assume the presidency and then use the presidency in any way to endorse that which clearly wars against the ways of the God you invoke? … Can you utter the words ‘so help me God’ if you should in any way take part in helping to lead a nation away from the God whose help you invoke?”

Those who were present described Cahn’s address as electrifying, a prophetic clarion call and nothing short of a historic moment. At the speech’s end, the gathering erupted into what one observer described as “a near riot.”

Cahn, messianic rabbi and pastor of the Jerusalem Center in Wayne, N.J., charges in his No. 1 best-selling Christian book and Christian movie that America is receiving the same divine warnings ancient Israel once did. Without an appropriate response, he warns, the nation will follow the same path to destruction.

Part of its appeal is the shocking signs appearing in the U.S. today, including Democratic leaders such as former Sen. Tom Daschle, one-time presidential hopeful Sen. John Edwards and even President Obama himself uttering the same prideful words spoken by ancient Israel in Isaiah 9:10 that prompted the judgment of God.

“The bricks are fallen down,” Isaiah 9:10 reads, “but we will build with hewn stones: the sycamores are cut down, but we will change them into cedars.”

Daschle said: “America will emerge from this tragedy as we have emerged from all adversity – united and strong. … I know there is only the smallest measure of inspiration that can be taken from this devastation. But there is a passage in the Bible from Isaiah that speaks to all of us at times like this.”

“Daschle has no idea what he is doing here,” explains Cahn. “He thinks he’s offering comforting words to a grief-stricken people, but he is actually embracing the spiritually defiant and arrogant words of the children of Israel, proclaiming the ancient and ominous vow of the leaders of that nation. He doesn’t realize it, but he is actually inviting more judgment on the nation.”

On the third anniversary of the attack, Sept. 11, 2004, another powerful U.S. senator who would eventually also suffer a disgraceful fall from the public stage, gave a speech to the Congressional Black Caucus.
Isaiah 9:10: “Today, on this day of remembrance and mourning, we have the Lord’s Word to get us through,” he said.

He then read Isaiah 9:10. He went on to talk about how America was doing just that – rebuilding with hewn stone and planting cedars.

Later, in his first State of the Union Address, Barack Obama took up the same theme.

On Feb. 24, 2009, President Obama echoed the defiant tone of the verse, saying in his address to Congress: “I want every American to know this: We will rebuild, we will recover, and the United States of America will emerge stronger than before.”

But on the very day President Obama was to be inaugurated the second time, Cahn joined with pastors, clergy, lay leaders, congressmen, senators, ambassadors and diplomats to pray, in part, that America would not continue its path of defiance unto judgment.

“According to the ancient mystery revealed in the Book of Isaiah, if after that first calamity and warning, the nation doesn’t return to God but responds in defiance, it will end up triggering a second calamity,” Cahn explains. “It was because of this ancient key, that, seven years after 9/11, the American economy collapsed. In the days after 9/11, the Federal Reserve slashed the base interest rate in an attempt to defy the consequences of the attacks. That action put us on the path leading to the collapse of the American economy seven years later. In 2008, the government made a second fatal mistake, another ill-fated financial decision that would trigger the collapse of the American economy. Amazingly, it took place on the seventh anniversary of the uttering of the ancient vow on Capitol Hill.”

He warns: “Before its destruction as a nation, ancient Israel received nine harbingers, prophetic omens of warning. The same nine harbingers are now manifesting in America with immediate ramifications for end-time prophecy.”

Now you can, for the first time, see for yourself that historic address:


By: Mark Altrogge

A lot of people are going to be surprised on judgment day. Because the things they do to believers they are really doing to Jesus himself personally. Everything from ISIS beheading Christians to North Koreans abusing believers in prison camps to that person at work who makes fun of you because of your faith. They’re not hurting mere humans, but everything they do they’re doing to Jesus himself, As Saul found out.

But Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest and asked him for letters to the synagogues at Damascus, so that if he found any belonging to the Way, men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem. Now as he went on his way, he approached Damascus, and suddenly a light from heaven shone around him. And falling to the ground he heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?” And he said, “Who are you, Lord?” And he said, “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. (Acts 9:1–5)

What a shock this must have been to Saul. No wonder he said later he was the foremost of sinners, for he had persecuted the church of God (1 Timothy 1:15). Every time he threw a believer into prison, he was abusing the Savior of the world. He was afflicting the Creator of the universe.

But those who persecute Christians are not the only ones who are going to be surprised on judgment day. Jesus said believers are going to be surprised:

Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’ (Matthew 25:34–39)

Anything we do for the lowliest believer—“the least of these my brothers”—we do to Jesus. Anything. And we don’t simply do it for Jesus, we do it to Jesus: “You did it to me.”

My dad would regularly take a mentally handicapped guy to pick up food. He’d bring him to church on Sunday, then take him to Wendy’s for a burger afterwards. I know that when my dad went to heaven last year, Jesus said, “JJ, every time you took Tommy to Wendy’s you were taking me.”

When you help a brother move, spend the day with a crew working on a widow’s house, pray for that discouraged sister, or slip that brother $20 to get some food, remember who you’re doing it to. Even the smallest acts of love we do for believers will be rewarded:

And whoever gives one of these little ones even a cup of cold water because he is a disciple, truly, I say to you, he will by no means lose his reward.” (Matthew 10:42)

“Even a cup of water!” Most of the deeds Jesus will reward won’t be monumental, but the smallest acts of kindness in his name.

All those diapers you change, all those stories you tell your kids at night, all those rides you give to the volleyball tournament—all will be rewarded. Every dollar you give to the poor, every visit to the nursing home, every trip to the hospital to see that sick brother, every long morning with the 3-year-olds in Children’s Ministry, every meal you take that family with the newborn, every word of consolation, every text to encourage, every prayer for that hurting believer—you do to Jesus himself and he won’t forget the smallest act of kindness. After all, he remembers every cup of water we give in his name.

So, do whatever you can today to bless brother or sister or someone in need. It doesn’t have to be big. And don’t bother trying to remember it because Jesus will remind you of it on judgment day.

Mark Altrogge has been senior pastor of Sovereign Grace Church of Indiana, Pennsylvania, since 1982. He has written hundreds of songs for worship, including “I Stand in Awe” and “I’m Forever Grateful.” Mark and his wife, Kristi, have four sons and one daughter. Find out more on his blog, The Blazing Center.


by Leslie Vernick

As Christian counselors, pastors and people helpers we often have a hard time discerning between an evil heart and an ordinary sinner who messes up, who isn’t perfect, and full of weakness and sin.

I think one of the reasons we don’t “see” evil is because we find it so difficult to believe that evil individuals actually exist. We can’t imagine someone deceiving us with no conscience, hurting others with no remorse, spinning outrageous fabrications to ruin someone’s reputation, or pretending he or she is spiritually committed yet has no fear of God before his or her eyes.

The Bible clearly tells us that among God’s people there are wolves that wear sheep’s clothing (Jeremiah 23:14; Titus 1:10; Revelations 2:2). It’s true that every human heart is inclined toward sin (Romans 3:23), and that includes evil (Genesis 8:21; James 1:4). We all miss God’ mark of moral perfection. However, most ordinary sinners do not happily indulge evil urges, nor do we feel good about having them. We feel ashamed and guilty, rightly so (Romans 7:19–21). These things are not true of the evil heart.

Below are five indicators that you may be dealing with an evil heart rather than an ordinary sinful heart.  If so, it requires a radically different treatment approach.

1. Evil hearts are experts at creating confusion and contention.

They twist the facts, mislead, lie, avoid taking responsibility, deny reality, make up stories, and withhold information. (Psalms 5:8; 10:7; 58:3; 109:2–5; 140:2; Proverbs 6:13,14; 6:18,19; 12:13; 16:20; 16:27, 28; 30:14; Job 15:35; Jeremiah 18:18; Nehemiah 6:8; Micah 2:1; Matthew 12:34,35; Acts 6:11–13; 2 Peter 3:16)

2. Evil hearts are experts at fooling others with their smooth speech and flattering words.

But if you look at the fruit of their lives or the follow through of their words, you will find no real evidence of godly growth or change. It’s all smoke and mirrors. (Psalms 50:19; 52:2,3; 57:4; 59:7; 101:7; Proverbs 12:5; 26:23–26; 26:28; Job 20:12; Jeremiah 12:6; Matthew 26:59; Acts 6:11–13; Romans 16:17,18; 2 Corinthians 11:13,14; 2 Timothy 3:2–5; 3:13; Titus 1:10,16).

3. Evil hearts crave and demand control, and their highest authority is their own self-reference.

They reject feedback, real accountability, and make up their own rules to live by. They use Scripture to their own advantage but ignore and reject passages that might require self-correction and repentance. (Romans 2:8; Psalms 10; 36:1–4; 50:16–22; 54:5,6; 73:6–9; Proverbs 21:24; Jude 1:8–16).

4. Evil hearts play on the sympathies of good-willed people, often trumping the grace card.

They demand mercy but give none themselves. They demand warmth, forgiveness, and intimacy from those they have harmed with no empathy for the pain they have caused and no real intention of making amends or working hard to rebuild broken trust. (Proverbs 21:10; 1 Peter 2:16; Jude 1:4).

5. Evil hearts have no conscience, no remorse.

They do not struggle against sin or evil—they delight in it—all the while masquerading as someone of noble character. (Proverbs 2:14–15; 10:23; 12:10; 21:27,29; Isaiah 32:6; Romans 1:30; 2 Corinthians 11:13–15)

If you are working with someone who exhibits these characteristics, it’s important that you confront them head on. You must name evil for what it is. The longer you try to reason with them or show mercy towards them, the more you, as the Christian counselor, will become a pawn in his or her game.

They want you to believe that:

1. Their horrible actions should have no serious or painful consequences.

When they say “I’m sorry,” they look to you as the pastor or Christian counselor to be their advocate for amnesty with the person he or she has harmed. They believe grace means they are immediately granted immunity from the relational fallout of their serious sin. They believe forgiveness entitles them to full reconciliation and will pressure you and their victim to comply.

The Bible warns us saying, “But when grace is shown to the wicked, they do not learn righteousness; even in a land of uprightness they go on doing evil and do not regard the majesty of the Lord (Isaiah 26:10).

The Bible tells us that talking doesn’t wake up evil people, but painful consequences might. Jesus didn’t wake up the Pharisee’s with his talk nor did God’s counsel impact Cain (Genesis 4). In addition, the Bible shows us that when someone is truly sorry for the pain they have caused, he or she is eager to make amends to those they have harmed by their sin (see Zacchaeus’ response when he repented of his greed in Luke 19).

Tim Keller writes, “If you have been the victim of a heinous crime. If you have suffered violence, and the perpetrator (or even the judge) says, ‘Sorry, can’t we just let it go?’ You would say, ‘No, that would be an injustice.’ Your refusal would rightly have nothing to do with bitterness or vengeance. If you have been badly wronged, you know that saying sorry is never enough. Something else is required—some kind of costly payment must be made to put things right.”1

As Biblical counselors let’s not collude with the evil one by turning our attention to the victim, requiring her to forgive, to forget, to trust again when there has been no evidence of inner change. Proverbs says, “Trusting in a treacherous man in time of trouble is like a bad tooth or a foot that slips” (Proverbs. 25:19). It’s foolishness.

The evil person will also try to get you to believe

2. That if I talk like a gospel-believing Christian I am one, even if my actions don’t line up with my talk.

Remember, Satan masquerades as an angel of light (2 Corinthians 11:13–15). He knows more true doctrine than you or I will ever know, but his heart is wicked. Why? Because although he knows the truth, he does not believe it or live it.

The Bible has some strong words for those whose actions do not match their talk (1 John 3:17,18; Jeremiah 7:8,10; James 1:22, 26). John the Baptist said it best when he admonished the religious leaders, “Prove by the way you live that you have repented of your sins and turned to God” (Luke 3:8).

If week after week you hear the talk but there is no change in the walk, you have every reason to question someone’s relationship with God.

Part of our maturity as spiritual leaders is that we have been trained to discern between good and evil. Why is that so important? It’s important because evil usually pretends to be good, and without discernment we can be easily fooled (Hebrews 5:14).

When you confront evil, chances are good that the evil heart will stop counseling with you because the darkness hates the light (John 3:20) and the foolish and evil heart reject correction (Proverbs 9:7,8). But that outcome is far better than allowing the evil heart to believe you are on his or her side, or that “he’s not that bad” or “that he’s really sorry” or “that he’s changing” when, in fact, he is not.

Daniel says, “[T]he wicked will continue to be wicked” (Daniel 12:10), which begs the question, do you think an evil person can really change?

[1] Tim Keller, Jesus the King, page 172

1st Peter

All Christians suffer. Either you have, you are, or you will — “through many tribulations we must enter the kingdom of God” (Acts 14:22).

This reality is a stark reminder that we have not reached the new heavens and new earth. The new Jerusalem of no tears and no pain, of no mourning and no death, hasn’t arrived yet (Revelation 21:1, 4).

But just because we experience suffering as we await the redemption of our bodies, it doesn’t mean that our suffering is random or without purpose. And neither does it mean that Scripture doesn’t tell us how to think about our suffering now.

Here are five important biblical truths about suffering every Christian should have ready:

1. Suffering is multifaceted.

Suffering has many faces. The Bible doesn’t whitewash our experience of suffering by saying that it’s all of one stripe. Rather, it recognizes the multifaceted ways that suffering can come upon us. The apostle Paul wrote, “We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed” (2 Corinthians 4:8–9).

In these two verses, Paul lists several types of suffering — mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual. Each of these are different ways that we can suffer, and when suffering comes, often several of these types of suffering are involved.

2. Suffering happens in community.

The church is not meant to be a loosely bound association of functional Lone Rangers. Paul confronts that type of thinking when he writes, “Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2).

The church is meant to be a refuge for those suffering. When a member is hurting, the church applies the bandages; when a member is down, the church encourages; when a member is in need, the church comes alongside to help.

3. Suffering equips us for ministry.

Firsthand experience in suffering is essential in equipping us for ministry. Paul writes in 2 Corinthians 1:4 that God “comforts us in all afflictions, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction with the comfort which we ourselves are comforted by God.”

But how? And what is the link between experiencing suffering and equipping for ministry? David Powlison answers this way:

When you’ve passed through your own fiery trials, and found God to be true to what he says, you have real help to offer. You have firsthand experience of both his sustaining grace and his purposeful design. He has kept you through pain; he has reshaped you more into his image. . . . What you are experiencing from God, you can give away in increasing measure to others. You are learning both the tenderness and the clarity necessary to help sanctify another person’s deepest distress. (Suffering and the Sovereignty of God, 166)

4. Suffering is a battleground.

Wherever there is suffering, there is a battle — a battle for your soul. The book of Job shows us there can be two ways to respond to suffering, one that curses God because of suffering and one that praises God, even in the midst of suffering (Job 2:9–10).

5. Suffering prepares us for more glory.

One of the counter-intuitive truths about suffering is that it prepares Christians for more glory. Paul writes in 2 Corinthians 4:17–18, “This light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.”

These verses are like sandpaper on our modern sentiments about suffering. We naturally try to avoid suffering at all costs but God brings suffering in our lives for the sake of our eternal joy — yes, even glory.